Read Green Men & White Swans: The Folklore of British Pub Names by Jacqueline Simpson Online

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An enchanting guide to the stories and legends behind Britain s traditional pub names.Why do British pubs have such curious names What tales lie behind the Moonrakers, the Hooden Horse, the Derby Tup And why does the Green Man come in different shapes and sizes In Green Men White Swans, leading folklorist Jacqueline Simpson explores the fascinating stories behind pub names, uncovering the myths and legends, euphemisms and wordplays, heroes and even ghosts that have inspired pub landlords over the centuries Spanning beloved locals from the Three Witches to the Three Nuns, from the Ashen Faggot to the Twa Corbies, this book is both an intriguing insight into the history of the British pub and a captivating journey through the country s dramatic past....

Title : Green Men & White Swans: The Folklore of British Pub Names
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0099520176
ISBN13 : 978-0099520177
Format Type : Hardcover
Language : Englisch
Publisher : Arrow 1 August 2011
Number of Pages : 368 Seiten
File Size : 981 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Green Men & White Swans: The Folklore of British Pub Names Reviews

  • Peter Durward Harris
    2018-11-28 14:39

    There have been several books about British pub names including The Old Dog and Duck: The Secret Meanings of Pub Names, but this is the first I've read. The author explains in the introduction that some names are outside the scope of this book, noting that the Nine Giants merely refers to nine trees without any associated folklore. Nevertheless, the main book features the Seven Sisters, which refers to seven trees planted by seven sisters, but that story has apparently passed into legend locally, so it qualifies.The author ridicules the widespread idea that the Elephant and Castle, is a corruption of Eleanor, Infant of Castile, and gives an alternative possible explanation about an Indian elephant with a load on its back that looks like a castle. I'll keep an open mind because both ideas seem plausible.The book lists the names with their associated descriptions in alphabetical order, but at intervals through the book there are features about categories of pub names. There is no contents page at the front although there is an index at the back. Still, unless one is directed to these feature pages, it's easy to forget where they are, so here's a list.Pages 16/7 - Angels and saintsPages 46/7 - Mother geese and cats with fiddlesPages 78/9 - Games and pastimesPages 112/3 - Puzzling pairsPages 138/9 - Puns and old jokesPages 182/3 - Harvesters and wheatsheavesPages 208/9 - Highwaymen and smugglersPages 248/9 - Queens' heads and red lionsPages 278/9 - Ghostly barmaids and haunted cellarsPages 310/1 - The year's merry roundI found this to be a very enjoyable book, though I was surprised to read that somebody tried reading it from beginning to end. It's not that type of book; it's something to dip in and out of. I would have given it 5 stars, but drop it to 4 because there isn't an easy way into those feature pages, which (unlike other pages) have borders round the text but no page numbers.

  • Honest Abe
    2018-11-23 11:13

    Took a fantastical and whimsical subject and made it plodding.

  • Peter Durward Harris
    2018-12-02 15:37

    There have been several books about British pub names including , but this is the first I've read. The author explains in the introduction that some names are outside the scope of this book, noting that the Nine Giants merely refers to nine trees without any associated folklore. Nevertheless, the main book features the Seven Sisters, which refers to seven trees planted by seven sisters, but that story has apparently passed into legend locally, so it qualifies.The author ridicules the widespread idea that the Elephant and Castle, is a corruption of Eleanor, Infant of Castile, and gives an alternative possible explanation about an Indian elephant with a load on its back that looks like a castle. I'll keep an open mind because both ideas seem plausible.The book lists the names with their associated descriptions in alphabetical order, but at intervals through the book there are features about categories of pub names. There is no contents page at the front although there is an index at the back. Still, unless one is directed to these feature pages, it's easy to forget where they are, so here's a list.Pages 16/7 - Angels and saintsPages 46/7 - Mother geese and cats with fiddlesPages 78/9 - Games and pastimesPages 112/3 - Puzzling pairsPages 138/9 - Puns and old jokesPages 182/3 - Harvesters and wheatsheavesPages 208/9 - Highwaymen and smugglersPages 248/9 - Queens' heads and red lionsPages 278/9 - Ghostly barmaids and haunted cellarsPages 310/1 - The year's merry roundI found this to be a very enjoyable book, though I was surprised to read that somebody tried reading it from beginning to end. It's not that type of book; it's something to dip in and out of. I would have given it 5 stars, but drop it to 4 because there isn't an easy way into those feature pages, which (unlike other pages) have borders round the text but no page numbers.