Read Voyeur: Romanzo per immagini (Italian Edition) by Flavio Caroli Online

voyeur-romanzo-per-immagini-italian-edition

Voyeur la storia di un fotografo che, nel corsodi una vita, perfeziona lo sguardo comestrumento filosofico per la comprensionedel mondo.L eros e la bellezza, o viceversa l orrore delleguerre dell ultimo mezzo secolo vissute inprima persona , sembrano raccogliere il lorosenso nella vita sempre pi essenziale delleforme in cui si manifestano le cose.Ma l ultima verit, sul limite estremo dell esistenza,porta bellezze e consapevolezze chelo sguardo non aveva saputo cogliere, interpretare,e forse neppure godere...

Title : Voyeur: Romanzo per immagini (Italian Edition)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B00HRK05RY
ISBN13 : -
Format Type : Other Book
Language : Italienisch
Publisher : MONDADORI 14 Januar 2014
Number of Pages : 109 Pages
File Size : 683 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Voyeur: Romanzo per immagini (Italian Edition) Reviews

  • None
    2019-02-17 06:07

    If this book doesn't disturb and confuse you enough in English, go ahead and read it in French. We did. This is by far the most confounding book we have happened upon during our college careers. The story line, or lack thereof, throws you for a loop, assuming you don't get lost in the cinematic language. We left this book feeling dumber than when we started. Bon chance!

  • therobbie@earthlink.net
    2019-02-04 04:19

    I wandered upon this book as a college freshman and couldn't not put it down. It is not a page-turner. It makes no sense. About six years later this book appeared on a syllabus in some post-modern class. Compare and contrast to JANE ERYE. Gosh, I never realised Charlotte Bronte was such a good writer.

  • S. Clark
    2019-02-15 07:07

    Captures the mental processes of a rigidly deranged person. Amazing accomplishment.

  • Craig B. Kielinski
    2019-02-07 04:15

    I read this after Jealousy and The Erasers- obviously already a fan of the Robbe-Grillet style but wondering where else he could take it. The key for me, beyond the intriguing search for "truth" or "reality" in all of his novels, and the creative inter-weaving and repetition of scenes that jump in time, place, and content, is the sense, about 50% to 70% into each novel, that you could imagine yourself on that island, or in the city in The Erasers, or on the banana farm in Jealousy. The detail is so vivid, but not tedious, because you are always on alert about what detail in the next paragraph changed from what you thought you knew, or reminds you of a previous scene, but its talking about a swan looking into the sea instead of a girl looking, or the swan is in a different spot, or the swan is outside the window in Mathias' childhood rather than on the island that he is visiting as an adult on a day trip merely to sell watches, possibly. Is the swan the Voyeur? Is the swan really a swan? Is the swan a minor side character/metaphor that I'm merely using as an example of the technique he used everywhere in novel? Etc. Great stuff.

  • frumiousb
    2019-01-25 08:03

    The Voyeur (Le Voyeur) was Robbe-Grillet's second published work.Much like The Erasers, The Voyeur deconstructs a genre story (murder mystery) into a set of descriptions and commonplaces, freeing the crime itself from any psychology or motive. Robbe-Grillet tells us a story without giving us an authoritative ending and without bothering to explain any of the back story at which the text hints.The language and the flow of text is fascinating, even in translation. The prose flows around the plot, as we see the main character's moments and ideas over and over again-- never sure if something is being revisited or if the beat is just similar to the ones that came before.This book is often packaged as a "typical" murder mystery, which it is not. The text is often quite demanding and I found myself scrambling to make sure that I had read things correctly. It will need re-reading before I really begin to grasp it, I believe. Luckily, this should not be a painful task.

  • kenw
    2019-02-16 01:16

    The only thing certain about this book is that Robbe-Grillet wrote it. A man visits an island to sell watches. Obsessive minute descriptions, dissolves that confuse the reader ( and the man) follow. What is real? Should the reader be making a diagram of the island roads and a list of distances and times as the man tries to sell his watches? How to explain the missing time - when something or perhaps not happened.

  • Darius
    2019-01-18 08:08

    Robbe-Grillet sets a beautiful scene for us: a protagonist (a man who we never really understand as we are only given the description of what his eyes see, never his inner thoughts), named Mathias, whose returning to his childhood town (some costal, french island, vividly imaged by the author), with the intent to sell watches (Mathias is a traveling watch salesman) to the natives of this picturesque town, only to be caught up in what one can describe as a guilt-stricken, possibly delusional self-assumption of the murder of a young girl which may or may not have happened.This novel has no resolution. Scenes merge in and out of each-other like vague traces of dreams: suddenly you are in a room looking at the checkered tiles, the varnished chest near the bed, the layer of dust on the table you have just sat down on, the checkered tiles, the woman bringing you coffee (but weren't you just in your bedroom?).This is sort of the way robbe Grillet lays out his story. In my own opinion, I think it has more to do with bringing the reader within himself to question his own perception of reality then to create a classic novel. Every one who reads this book from front to back will have his own opinion on some symbolism, message, meaning, not-meaning, purpose or function this book serves.The idea of the Noveau Roman was to deconstruct the typical novel into the harsh realty of life (in the existentialist point of view) as man, inside of himself, separated from the world around him, and faced with a cancerous detachment from the absurdity of the lifeless objects around him... Left only to his perception, as even his thoughts have betrayed him.The novel succeeds in creating a world outside of time or the laws of realty. By the end of this novel, I had such a rich, vivid recollection of the world and people I met along the way, that it's mental images are still embedded, like fragments of a dream that we never forget; you will understand the geography of the world that Grillet has designed and by the end of it, should be able to navigate the island yourself. ;) (it's all about ones imagination).Also, great twists towards the end... Left me with goosebumps.

  • S. Shea
    2019-01-25 23:54

    This a book for writers. You have to like psychological thrillers, and don't expect to be handed all the answers. But if you want something different, by an awesome writer, do get this book and read it.